Purim Mask

Purim Mask

Purim
We are a few days from Erev Purim! I hope you have a costume planned and a place to go for the Purim Schpiel. Purim is one of those “different” holidays. There’s the kids’ level – a story of Queen Esther saving the Jews, and the adult level – where there’s a lot of killing, beginning with Vashti. I don’t suggest that you start with the dark story with kids. But it is worth the time to learn the full story and to investigate the rabbinic teachings on this story in which God is never mentioned.

Here’s a somewhat sanitized version of the story from My Jewish Learning.

Here is a more complete and darker version from Chabad.

On the light side, go here to download a printable template for a Purim crown from Chai and Home.

Of course, you’ll need to eat! So here are some Hamenashen recipes.

Trouble Times
Many of you are aware that I have a multiracial, interfaith, multiethnic family. I’ve been more frightened of my own government that ever before. What has helped me is to become part of the activism that is growing rapidly. A friend told me about an app that will send you a “Daily Action” https://dailyaction.org I have attended services at synagogues and churches. I have marched and will again. Don’t just sit there and get depressed! Look into your conscience and act on behalf of those who are vulnerable. Every major faith believes in protecting those who are unable to protect themselves.

Bomb Threats
Yes, there have been a lot of bomb threats to Jewish buildings, especially JCCs and Jewish schools. But guess what? A number of Muslim veterans have tweeted that they want to guard Jewish organizations! Many Muslim organizations have reached out to offer compassion and support to the Jewish community. Our own Palo Alto JCC was threatened and a local group of Muslim-Jewish women sent them this letter of support.

EVENTS
Purim Carnival (Walnut Creek)
Tri-Valley Cultural Jews Purim Celebration (Livermore)
Shushan County Fair (Saratoga)
This Shabbat Rocks! (San Mateo)
Wendy Mogel “Blessing of a Skinned Knee” (Los Gatos)
Beyond Bubbie: Taste of the Old East (Berkeley)
An Evening of Learning About Jewish Mindfulness (San Mateo)
Jewish Women’s Theater presents Exile: Kisses on Both Cheeks (San Rafael)
Passover Second Night Seder (Walnut Creek)

Purim Carnival
Join us for a fun filled afternoon with Pony Rides, Laser Tag, Giant Inflatables, Face Painting, Midway Games, and Fun Prizes. Hot dog lunch and carnival treats for purchase.

Date: Sunday, March 12
Time: 11:00am – 1:30pm
Place: Congregation B’nai Shalom, 74 Eckley Lane, Walnut Creek
Cost: $18 per child includes all games; $20 at door per child
RSVP office@bshalom.org

Tri-Valley Cultural Jews Purim Celebration
Tri-Valley Cultural Jews will be holding a secular Purim celebration! We will make hamantaschen, have crafts, games, and fun for all ages, and present our annual Purim skit. Attendees are welcome to come dressed as their favorite Purim character.

Date: Sunday, March 12
Time: 10:30am – 12:30pm
Place: The Bothwell Arts Center, 2466 8th St., Livermore
Cost: Free for TVCJ members, and costs $10 for non-members (which can be applied to a membership if someone wishes to join).
For more information email maluba2@yahoo.com

Shushan County Fair
Come One, Come All, to the Shushan County Fair!
Fun for all ages.
Featuring the Klezmer band “Hot Kugel”
Pony Up Petting Zoo
Rides and Inflatables Including a 20’ Slide
Haman Haunted House
Games, Food, Entertainment
White Elephant Sale and Auction
Exhibit Hall, Contests and Prizes
Demonstrations: Robot pancake maker, Shaving soap & candle making, Yarn spinning, 3D printer and more.

Date: Sunday, March 12
Time: 11:00am – 3:00pm
Place: Beth David, 19700 Prospect Road, Saratoga
Cost: Pre-purchase a wristband for access to all inflatables and games plus a $5 voucher for food! Online or call the office 408-257-3333. $30 before March 3rd and $36 at the door. Individual tickets for games and rides will also be available for sale at the event. Buy tickets online.

This Shabbat Rocks!
This joyous Shabbat service will awaken our bodies and souls with a prayerful shake, rattle, and roll. Come and experience this vibrant service with The Band and you’ll find yourself exclaiming, “this Shabbat rocks!”

Date: March 18
Time: 9:00am – 9:40am
Place: Peninsula Temple Beth El, 1700 Alameda de las Pulgas, San Mateo
www.ptbe.org

Wendy Mogel “Blessing of a Skinned Knee”
Dr. Wendy Mogel, clinical psychologist, parenting expert, and New York Times best-selling author of The Blessing of a Skinned Knee and The Blessing of a B-, will be giving a parenting talk.
Dr. Mogel’s books address the question of how to raise resilient children in the face of trends toward anxious parenting and over-parenting

Date: March 23
Time: 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Place: Addison-Penzak JCC, 14855 Oka Road, Los Gatos
Cost: General admission is $18, JCC members $10. JCC members get a special early bird price of $7 when you buy tickets online by 3/15.

Beyond Bubbie: Taste of the Old East
with Reboot and JIMENA
Join us for an immersive Sephardic culinary experience where participants will get a taste of traditional North African and Middle Eastern Passover recipes and stories from JIMENA speakers. Guest chefs will each prepare and demonstrate a traditional Sephardic dish from their country of origin. These chefs and other members of the community will share their stories and the family histories that go along with them. Come for the food, stay for the conversation.

Date: Thursday, March 23
Time: 7:30 pm
Place: JCC East Bay Berkeley Branch, 1414 Walnut St, Berkeley
Cost: $12 (presale, student, senior, member); $15 (at the door)
Tickets here.

An Evening of Learning About Jewish Mindfulness
with Rabbi Jeff Roth
Rabbi Roth offers a contemporary approach to Jewish meditation. He focuses on the practice of mindfulness/heartfulness, combined with the teachings of Torah, to offer a path to liberate us from alienation, awaken us to the truth of the present moment, and open us to a sense of the Divine Presence.

Date: Thursday, March 23
Time: 7:00 – 8:30 pm
Place: Peninsula Temple Beth El, 1700 Alameda de las Pulgas, San Mateo
Sponsored by Or HaLev, the Center for Jewish Spirituality at Peninsula Temple Beth El.
This program is free, but please help us plan: RSVP to cserbin@ptbe.org by March 21.

Jewish Women’s Theater presents Exile: Kisses on Both Cheeks
Come for an evening of salon-style theatrical entertainment with professional actors performing contemporary stories in intimate settings. Exile: Kisses on Both Cheeks explores the Sephardic legacy of family, community and country, looking for home more than 500 years after the expulsion from Spain. It is a Jewish immigrant story that is rarely told on stage. Until now.

Date: Sunday, April 2
Time: 5:00pm-7:00pm
Place: Osher Marin JCC, 200 North San Pedro Rd., San Rafael
http://www.marinjcc.org
Cost: $18 Members; $25 Public and same-day tickets. Purchase tickets here.

Passover Second Night Seder
Join us second night for a family friendly service led by Rabbi Daniel Stein and Hazzan Wallach. Please call Alyssa at 925-934-9446 x102 to get all the details and to tell her what entrée you want.

Date: Tuesday, April 11
Time: 6:30pm Service
Place: Congregation B’nai Shalom, 74 Eckley Lane, Walnut Creek
Cost: $54 per adult 13 and up; $36 per child ages 9-12; $15 per child ages 5-8; Free for children 4 and under
RSVP office@bshalom.org by Tuesday March 28th

Posted by admin under Community Activities, Jewish Culture, Purim, symbolic foods
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Oshman JCC Logo

Several bay area JCC’s have received bomb threats and had to evacuate their facilities. When the Palo Alto/Oshman Family JCC was the victim of a threat they got a wonderful response from the Muslim-Jewish Women’s Group. Here’s what the JCC posted on their Facebook page.

Today we had a personal visit from a remarkable group of women—the Muslim-Jewish Women’s Group. Thank you for your support, and thank you to the Evergreen Islamic Center, the Mayor’s office and the many other organizations and individuals who have offered an outpouring of encouragement. #IStandWithTheJCC

PA JCC letter

Did you note the sentence, “Your suffering is our suffering; your children are our children.” No matter what faith tradition you follow there is always talk of God’s children. We are the single family of humankind. How beautiful this letter is!

Be ready to stand as a protective presence for Muslims, immigrants, LGBT. As Rabbi Menachem Creditor said at gathering at the Good Shepherd Church, “We are ready to make a circle around this church.”

Go out there and say something kind to someone. Maybe even to 4 or 5 someones.

Posted by admin under A meaningful life, Community
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Purim at East Bay JCC

Purim at East Bay JCC

Dear friends, it has been an extremely difficult couple of months for those of us with multiracial, multi-ethnic families. Many of us are related to immigrants and some of us ARE immigrants. Please know that the Jewish community is acutely aware of what it feels like to be harassed and fearful. (There have been more than 60 bomb threats to Jewish community centers and Jewish schools in the last month.)

I was heartened to read the email Amy Tobin, CEO of the Jewish Community Center of the East Bay sent to the JCC members. I asked permission to share it with all of you. Here it is.

Dear Friends,

Over the last two months, Jewish organizations around the United States, including JCCs, have received threatening phone calls. While the JCC East Bay has not received such a threat, we remain vigilant and committed to the security and safety of our community above all else. We maintain strong security protocols and evacuation procedures, and the JCC continues to work closely with local and federal law enforcement.

In recent weeks, the rise in anti-Semitism has received increased national attention. This is, in part, due to the terrible desecration of two Jewish cemeteries in St. Louis and Philadelphia. The number of threats against Jewish institutions has grown. At the same time, the Jewish community has increased its public pressure on government leaders to take a strong stand against hate and to step up its investigation of these incidents.

We know that these events have been painful to absorb. We recognize that members and program participants may have specific concerns and encourage you to continue to share them with us. This is your community center, a place that vibrates with life and learning because of you.

At the JCC East Bay, we are concerned not only about the rise in anti-Semitic behavior, but about the rise in hateful rhetoric and crimes against many sister faiths and communities. We have seen arson attacks at two Islamic Centers. Latino and Muslim individuals are concerned for their safety and freedom, both in their communities and at the borders. In the last two years, we have seen unspeakable acts committed against the African-American community at Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church, and against the LGBTQ community in Orlando.

This moment is not just a Jewish moment. This is a cultural moment, in which we are challenged to stand united against hatred and discrimination. This is an opportunity to work for our shared values: freedom, safety and equal rights for all.

As Jews and as Americans, we take inspiration from past generations. Our history has taught us to find strength under difficult circumstances. Our community will not be intimidated by hatred. We will work more passionately for tolerance among all people. We will celebrate and thrive in community.

Thank you for being a part of the Jewish Community Center of the East Bay.

Warmly,
Amy Tobin
Chief Executive Officer

You are not alone. I am not alone. Together we will support and protect each other. I hope you have a community – whether Jewish or Christian or Muslim, whether religious or a group of friends – that is supporting you. If you don’t, it’s time to get one now. Contact me if you need help.

May we all reach Shalom – peace and wholeness.

Dawn
dawn@buildingjewishbridges.org

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Sunset in Tel Aviv

Sunset in Tel Aviv

Are you worried about whether there is a two state solution in Israel? So is Rabbi Milder of Beth Emek. He sent this message to his congregation. (Thank you to Rabbi Milder for letting me reprint this.)

The Two State and the One State

I watched the press conference held by President Trump and Prime Minister Netanyahu this past Wednesday.

The first question asked of Trump by an Israeli reporter was, “Are you giving up on the two-state solution?” His answer was “I’m looking at the two state and the one state. I support whatever the two parties like the best.”

This is a change in policy that should be of concern to all of us. For the past 15 years, each of the past three Presidents has explicitly endorsed a commitment to a two-state solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. That means that they have favored a secure Israel as well as an independent Palestinian state.

When Trump says that a one-state option is under consideration, our country is no longer advocating a vision of two states for two peoples.

I share the concern of the Central Conference of American Rabbis and the Association of Reform Zionists of America, who responded to the President’s shift in policy this way:

We continue to envision Israel thriving as a Jewish State, living in peace and security alongside a Palestinian State that would fulfill the legitimate national aspirations of its people.

Reform rabbis and Reform Zionist leaders are dismayed that President Trump has backed away from decades of bipartisan US policy supporting the two-state solution. The President opined that a one-state solution might also bring peace. However, given demographic realities in the region, one democratic state between the Mediterranean Sea and the Jordan River would eventually bring an end to Israel’s character as a Jewish State. The alternative, Israel’s rejecting democracy, should be unthinkable.

I believe it is more urgent than ever to recommit to the vision of a two-state solution, and to articulate that vision in the public sphere. It is, I believe, the only way to ensure the future of Israel as a Jewish and democratic state.

Rabbi Larry Milder

Posted by admin under In the News, Israel
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baby toes pixabay

I’m in the planning stage of a program on adoption in interfaith/intercultural and Jewish families. As I spoke to various local people who are adoptive parents I got this email from Michael Tejeda, a gentleman who has been generous in sharing his insights.

As you might expect, I have some opinions about this.

I didn’t convert until my daughter was 7 years old, so we were an interfaith family for that amount of time. I remember struggling with this at the time since I was always philo-Semitic, my wife is Jewish and my daughter had an infant conversion but I just wasn’t religious.

I believed that my daughter wouldn’t benefit from a split religious upbringing. We attended Christmas celebrations with friends and relatives and we also had Passover and Hannukah. We told our daughter that lots of people were Christians, among other things, but that she and mom were Jewish. When my daughter was 7, I took the plunge. I remember when she realized what had happened she said to me, “Daddy, now we are a real Jewish family”. So even at a young age, we had already taught her to value her Jewish identity.

I know lots of interfaith families and unless the religion of one or the other parent predominates, the result is more often than not a child who grows up irreligious. This isn’t good for the Jews. You can respect and love Christians but if your kid ends up believing in Jesus, they won’t be Jewish. That’s really the bottom line.

Christianity is all around us. It’s very easy for someone to have an indeterminate faith and wind up as an adult falling into one of the many varieties of Christian practice. Without giving a child a fairly definite idea of what Jewish faith and practice is, they are unlikely to find it in the larger world.

Don’t get me wrong, I actually think that intermarriage is fine. Look at me. My intermarriage brought two new Jews into the fold, my adopted daughter and me. I just think that you have to think about it in advance and decide what the child’s religious identity is going to be – hopefully Jewish.

I believe that some of our problem is a failure of Jewish institutions to adapt to the situation that American Jews find themselves in. Despite the increasing rate of interfaith marriages, there is no official mechanism to “Jewishly” sanctify intermarriages.

When I was a kid, the American Catholic Church, while not encouraging intermarriage, had long since stopped forbidding it. There was an official marriage ceremony, performed by a priest. It was called getting married “outside the altar rail”. After my father died, my mother got married again in such a ceremony, since my mother was a Catholic and my new step father was a Protestant of indeterminate variety.

In order to have this Catholic wedding ceremony, my step father had to agree to support my mother in raising the children as Catholics. He agreed and they had a Catholic wedding. All of us kids (5) were provided with a Catholic upbringing. In retrospect it was an ingenious system.

I’ll bet if there was such a system for Jews, more than half of the intermarrying couples would take advantage of it and It would solve a lot of the interfaith marriage problems.

As you can see my system prefers to operate with a Jewish bias and I think that you are looking for something even handed.

What I’m looking for is honest opinions and experiences. Michael has shared his real life experiences and I thank him for that.

The program I am planning will occur on Thursday, April 20 in Walnut Creek. Email me for details, Dawn, dawn@buildingjewishbridges.org

Posted by admin under Children, Conversion, In their own words
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Angel prayer amulet

Many people of all faiths are suffering right now. There is fear and a sense of helplessness. But we are not helpless. There are large, communal actions we can take. But there are also small intimate actions that build a sense of trust, community, safely — in our very own neighborhoods.

Cantor Jennie Chabon of B’nai Tikvah in Walnut Creek sent the following personal and powerful message to her congregation.

Sometimes when the vastness of the pain and injustice in the world feels overwhelming, a small gesture on a local level can be a soothing balm to our troubled souls.

Yesterday was one of those days when I needed something tangible to combat my sense of helplessness against the barrage of bad news on the radio and tv. So my family and I went to the store and bought delicious food to give away: cookies, dates, fresh bread, oranges. When we got home, we arranged the food in a basket and walked across the street to our neighbors’ house.

Our neighbors are Muslim, and though they have lived in their house for a long time, I have had only one conversation with them, a few years ago when the grandmother of their family brought over a plate of lemon cake and candy during the height of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. At that time, she offered us the plate with no explanation, just that she wanted to give it to us to enjoy. We all understood why she was there and we were so moved by her gesture. We closed the door praying for peace on our little street, even if it doesn’t exist world-wide.

Yesterday, her daughter in law opened the door in her hijab, 8 months pregnant and very surprised to see us on her doorstep. I gave her the basket and told her that it was an offering of peace for their family. I could almost not get the words out because of the tears fighting to pour out of my eyes. She put her hand to her heart and introduced herself. She told us about her family. I wished her the traditional Hebrew blessing for a pregnant woman, that the baby should come out b’sha’ah tovah, at the good, right, blessed time. She is naming her baby Maya, meaning princess.

The whole interaction lasted just a few minutes, but staring into that woman’s eyes and talking with her filled me with hope, and renewed my commitment to continue working for justice and peace. I didn’t need to explain that I was moved to bring her food because so many Muslims have been detained at airports across the country. We all understood. I see you, I tried to say with my eyes. I see the holy spark of the Divine in you and I pray with all of my heart that peace will come to Jews and Muslims and all people across our country during this divided time.

My prayer this Shabbat is for us all to find small moments of holiness to help us navigate the fear and uncertainty in our world. May Shabbat be a day of restoration and renewed faith and joy for us all.

Right now is a very good time to belong to a synagogue (or religious institution of your own choice) because you will give and receive both the personal comfort that one person can offer another, and because as a community your efforts have greater impact. Don’t go it alone.

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grandparent

My mother’s father was raised Jewish, and so was his brother. The brother moved to Australia and raised a Jewish family, but my mother’s father gave up the Jewish faith and encouraged his children to adopt the religion of their new country, America. Am I Jewish by birth? There is a Reform synagogue not far from me, but how should I identify myself when I go there?
Am I Jewish?

Dear Am I: This is a complicated question and there isn’t an easy answer. Traditional Jewish law has held that Judaism is passed through the mother. Thus, by traditional Jewish law, you are seen as a person of Jewish heritage but not a Jew.

However, within the U.S. Reform movement, there is an acceptance of patrilineal descent. Official policy says that the child of either a Jewish man or woman who is raised with Jewish lifecycle events and holidays is a Jew. However, neither you nor your parents were raised as Jews.

I believe you could find a rabbi that would accept you as a Jew with one Jewish grandfather, but be prepared: This is not a mainstream belief and you will have challenges due to your lack of Jewish memories and practices. It is very common for Jews to ask one another things like, “Where were you bar mitzvahed?” “Did you go to Jewish summer camp? Where?” “You live in Berkeley? Which shul do you go to?” “Do you know the Abramsons?”

These questions are not meant to embarrass or probe, but rather to establish connections. It is commonly referred to as “playing Jewish geography.” However, for you, it would come out early in this game that you don’t have any Jewish markers. At that point, you may be told, quite casually, “Oh, so you’re not really Jewish.”

If you choose to simply “join in” with a synagogue that accepts you as Jewish, do talk to your rabbi about how to handle these questions. Or give me a call and we can chat about it.

What I have seen over the years is that people with Jewish heritage who did not receive a Jewish upbringing often profit by going the route of conversion.

First, you will you receive the education that you missed out on.

Also, you’ll make a formal commitment to being a Jew and cast your lot with the Jews. In effect, you’ll be drawing a line that says, “That was then. This is now.”

Plus, you’ll have something tangible to prove you are a Jew: the certificate of conversion and your educational process. Moreover, the conversion process takes at least a year, and in that time you’ll work closely with your rabbi, creating an opportunity to become close and to have a special bond with him/her. You’ll grow in confidence and be personally guided by your rabbi, and I can’t tell you how many good things come from this.

Are you thinking you would like to reclaim your Jewish heritage? Before you simply tell a rabbi, “I want to be a Jew,” you should know what that means. I suggest you read a book on basic Judaism, talk to any Jewish friends, talk to your Jewish family members if you can. Best of all, consider taking an Introduction to Judaism class. A class will give you a deeper knowledge of a very complex religion. If you decide not to be Jewish, at least you’ll better understand your great uncle and his family.

If you feel you are ready to go speak to a rabbi, do. It will be helpful if you can articulate why you think you want to be Jewish, and why now.

I must also ask: How old are you? If you are underage you won’t be able to convert without your parents’ support of the idea. In fact, some rabbis will turn you away until they believe you are of an age and have enough life experience to make this life-changing decision.

While switching from one religion to another has become relatively common in the United States, it is taken seriously by Judaism. The reason is that Jewish tradition teaches that once a Jew, always a Jew. So if you find that you don’t want to be Jewish in a few years, according to Jewish law, you will be responsible for the same level of Jewish practice anyway.

Many Jews may not take Jewish law (halachah) seriously, but more observant Jews and certainly clergy do. So they are trying to protect you from yourself. Good luck.

Posted by admin under Adult Child of an Interfaith Family, Mixed & Matched, Non-Jewish family
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B'nai Tikvah's window

B’nai Tikvah’s window

This Shabbat Rabbi Rebecca Gutterman of B’nai Tikvah in Walnut Creek sent the following email to her congregation. You probably all know about the sequoia that fell in Calaveras Big Trees State Park. Rabbi Gutterman draws a connection to this week’s Torah portion, Vayechi. Reading it gave me the shivers. For those of us who have lost loved ones and can remember places that don’t exist anymore this piece will be bittersweet.

“Brought down by California Storm,” the headline read.

The article that followed was not about anyone’s homes, moods or daily routines. It was about the Pioneer Cabin Tree, a sequoia in Calaveras Big Trees State Park. Given that sequoias can easily live over 1,000 years, this particular one had seen horses and carts, cars and pedestrians pass through. The idea of such a giant falling as a result of this most recent spate of wind and rain seems unreal. But it’s true.

“It is a fearful thing to love what death can touch,” wrote Rabbi Chaim Stern of blessed memory. Yet these are exactly the circumstances under which we live and love, always. Loss is disorienting to say the least, and never more so when the person, thing, or grounding reality we lose is one we thought would always be here. Perhaps the mark of true resilience lies in finding new paths to walk and new sources of meaning, even with hearts forever altered.

Vayechi, this week’s Torah portion, marks the ending of the first book of the Torah. Appropriately enough, it concludes with the blessing of Jacob’s sons, immediately followed by both Jacob and Joseph’s deaths. These losses were not only significant for their families, but also life altering for their descendants – the tribes who would become an enslaved people in Egypt.

That’s part of the reason why the closing lines of Vayechi are so significant. Joseph extracted one last promise from his brothers: that when their time of deliverance came, they would carry his bones out of Egypt with them. And so their descendants did, hundreds of years later. This gesture was a way of symbolizing that the most important parts of our pasts come forward with us into our future. As long as we guard our memories, tell our stories, create our legacies, then long ago fragments can be made whole again, even if differently so.

Ancestral bones. Remains of ancient trees. Let us set aside some time this Shabbat and during the coming week to think about what is most enduring in our lives, even in the midst of dislocation or loss. What is most worthy of being held inside and carried forward?

I leave you with a poem by Howard Nemerov that brought me solace and inspiration this week. I hope it brings the same to you.

Shabbat Shalom,

Rabbi Gutterman

TREES

To be a giant and keep quiet about it,
To stay in one’s own place;
To stand for the constant presence of process
And always to seem the same;
To be steady as a rock and always trembling,
Having the hard appearance of death
With the soft, fluent nature of growth,
One’s Being deceptively armored,
One’s Becoming deceptively vulnerable;
To be so tough, and take the light so well,
Freely providing forbidden knowledge
Of so many things about heaven and earth
For which we should otherwise have no word-
Poems or people are rarely so lovely,
And even when they have great qualities
They tend to tell you rather than exemplify
What they believe themselves to be about,
While from the moving silence of trees,
Whether in storm or calm, in leaf and naked,
Night or day, we draw conclusions of our own,
Sustaining and unnoticed as our breath,
And perilous also-though there has never been
A critical tree-about the nature of things.

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Photo from Pixabay

Photo from Pixabay

Here we go – 2017! Our world has been shaken. I, for one, was stunned by the election results. The majority of my family and friends are in categories that feel increasingly unsafe. As a woman I have been subject to sexual harassment and as a Jew I have been told I wasn’t welcome (yes, literally asked to leave). But that feels small compared to my Muslim friends, my African American niece, my Hispanic nephew, my many LGBT friends, and friends who were brought to America as infants from Mexico and fear deportation to a land they’ve never seen.

I admit that I was paralyzed for several days. But then I remembered that I need to use my privilege to protect the vulnerable. The major faiths all state that we are responsible for our sisters and brothers – no matter their race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, etc. So time to get crackin’!

It is a whole lot easier to move mountains with your community that all alone. I hope you are involved with your synagogue, church or mosque. If you need to get connected just contact me. (dawn@buildingjewishbridges.org).

My job is still to help interfaith couples and families discover whether and how they can feel comfortable in the Jewish community. Call me anytime.

I LOVE it when I run into one of you out and about! Do always say hello.

EVENTS
Jacob and Wrestling and Finding Balance in the New Year (Oakland)
Tots ‘n Torah (Burlingame)
Jewish Overnight Camp Fair (Palo Alto)
Introduction to Judaism Winter 2017 (San Francisco)
Intro to Judaism Class: Israel and Texts (Berkeley)
The Book of Ruth (Oakland)
Ruach! (Spirit!) (Danville)
Mizmor Shir! Social Action Shabbat (Oakland)
Shabbatot (San Francisco)
Sababa Shabbat (Oakland)
Be a Fabulous Interfaith Grandparent! (Pleasanton)
It Wouldn’t Be Make Believe: A Sing-along Concert (Oakland)
Prayerbook Blues? (Danville)
Book Discussion: “Why Be Jewish?” (Palo Alto)
Family Learning Day: The Secret Life of Bees and Trees (Berkeley)
Wilderness Torah’s Tu B’Shvat in the Redwoods (Oakland)
Master the Interfaith, Intercultural, Multigenerational Seder (Pleasanton)

Jacob and Wrestling and Finding Balance in the New Year
A special musical Kabbalat Shabbat
Temple Beth Abraham’s singers have compiled a handful of songs to add to this week’s regular Friday evening service. Inspired by the stories of Jacob wrestling and Rabbi Bloom’s high holiday theme of balance, they invite you to start the new secular year with a mix of niggunim, contemporary Jewish tunes, traditional spirituals, jazz melodies as well as a Polish melody brought back from the congregation’s trip to Eastern Europe last summer.

Date: Friday, January 13
Time: 6:15 – 7:15 pm
Place: Temple Beth Abraham, in the chapel, 327 MacArthur Blvd, Oakland
www.tbaoakland.org

Tots ‘n Torah
Please join us for a musical and festive Shabbat service geared to preschool-age children.
Tots ‘n Torah is open to our entire community.
RSVP includes a light meal for parents and children ($5 for children, $10 for adults). The meal is usually immediately after the short service.
(We send out evites to get an RSVP count for each event. If you are not receiving these evites and would like to be added to the list, please email asteckley@sholom.org)
At dinner there will be a sign in sheet on your table, so there is no need to pay in advance, but please RSVP to the evite so we can order the right amount of food for all.

Dates: Jan. 13, Feb. 10, March. 10, April 14, May 12
Time: service at 6pm; dinner at 6:30pm
Place: Peninsula Temple Sholom, 1655 Sebastian Dr, Burlingame
PLEASE contact Rabbi Lisa at rabbidelson@sholom.org and let her know to expect you. She is concerned about having enough food.

Jewish Overnight Camp Fair
Are you interested in a Jewish overnight camp experience for your kids or teens? Come to the Fair where there will be LOTS of camps represented. Including:

Buck’s Rock Performing and Creative Arts Camp
Brandeis Pre-College Programs
Camp Alonim
Camp Be’chol Lashon
Camp Kimama
Camp Ramah
Camp Tawonga
Habonim Dror—Camp Gilboa
JCC Maccabi Sports Camp
URJ 6 Points Sports Academy
URJ Camp Newman

Date: January 15
Time: 4:00-6:00pm
Place: Osher Family JCC, 3921 Fabian Way, Palo Alto
www.paloaltojcc.org

Introduction to Judaism Winter 2017
Join with Emanu-El clergy to learn about the breadth and wonder of Jewish tradition. This class is a pathway for the adult learner who wishes to discover or deepen Jewish knowledge, non-Jews who are marrying a Jewish partner, and those who are considering conversion to Judaism.

Date: January 17, 2017
Time: 7:00 pm – 9:00pm
Place: Temple Emanu-El, 2 Lake St., San Francisco
www.emanuelsf.org
Details here.

Introduction to the Jewish Experience: Israel and Texts
Introduction to the Jewish Experience is a three-part series of classes to introduce students to Jewish culture and practice. Students come from a wide variety of backgrounds: Jews who did not receive a Jewish education, Jews who wish to resume their education as adults, persons interested in conversion to Judaism, and others who wish to learn more about Judaism. The three parts of the series may be taken in any order. Please pre-register.

Dates: Wednesdays, January 18 – March 8
Time: 7:30 – 9:00 pm
Place: Beth El, 1301 Oxford St., Berkeley
Cost: $105 for the public; $90 for members of Beth El and Temple Sinai.
Register here.

The Book of Ruth
This brief but fascinating text touches so many bases in our understanding of the Biblical world: daily life, family, clan and national identity, and the roles and limitations of women. This four-session class will delve into each of the four chapters of this brilliantly concise yet expressive text, both revealing the world of Ruth and linking its timeless meaning to our world.

Dates: Thursdays, January 19, February 2 and 16, March 2
Time: 7:00–8:30pm
Place: Temple Sinai, 2808 Summit St., Oakland
Cost: $50
Register here.
Co-sponsored with Lehrhaus Judaica.

Ruach! (Spirit!)
Please join us for this joyful, spirited service featuring music by the incomparable Dean Chapman!!
Ruach service is followed by Ice Cream Sundaes!

Place: Friday, January 20
Time: 7:00pm
Place: Beth Chaim, 1800 Holbrook Dr, Danville
www.bethchaim.com

Mizmor Shir! Social Action Shabbat
This year, Social Action Shabbat will feature poetry performances by 2015 Oakland Youth Poet Laureate Tova Ricardo and two Slam Champions. We will hear their poetry during the service and have an opportunity to talk with them during the oneg. Youth Speaks, the organization who helped them develop their voices, will be with us as well. Join us.

Date: January 20
Time: 7:30pm
Place: Temple Sinai, 2808 Summit St., Oakland
www.oaklandsinai.org

Shabbatot
Our new community-based, music, song, and story-filled Shabbat service and dinner.
3rd Friday of the month will include a short service at 6pm and an inter-generational dinner will be served at 6:30pm.
There is no cost for this program.
We would like our programs to be accessible to those with chemical sensitivities and allergies, and therefore support a fragrance-free environment.

Date: January 20 and Feb. 17
Time: Begins at 6pm. You can leave or stay for the 6:30pm dinner
Place: Sha’ar Zahav, 290 Dolores St., San Francisco
If you have questions, please contact Adam Pollack, Director of Engagement at adam@shaarzahav.org or at 415-861- 6932
Details here.

Sababa Shabbat
Join us for Sababa Shabbat, our special Shabbat program for young children (pre-school age through 2nd grade) and their families. Join us for pizza and salad dinner (Dinner price is $25 per family, please RSVP by Wed, Jan 18 here, No one shall be turned away due to lack of funds.) or join us afterwards at 6pm for a small child friendly, music-filled Kabbalat Shabbat service. We look forward to sharing Shabbat with you and yours!

Date: Friday evening, January 20
Time: 5:30pm for the dinner and 6pm for child friendly services
Place: Temple Sinai, 2808 Summit St., Oakland
Questions? Please contact Michael@oaklandsinai.org

Be a Fabulous Interfaith Grandparent!
Explore how to engage in Jewish activities with grandchildren without overstepping boundaries.

Date: Feb. 6
Time: 7:30 to 9pm
Place: Beth Emek, 3400 Nevada Court, Pleasanton
Cost: $8, no one turned away.
Register here.

It Wouldn’t Be Make Believe
A Sing-along Concert

The songs of Yip Harburg and Lorenz Hart. We’ll project the words on a screen. All you need is your voice (and maybe your glasses).
Recognized these songs:
Brother, Can You Spare a Dime?
Over the Rainbow
My Funny Valentine
Join other people too shy to sing alone for a musical evening.

Date: Sat., Feb. 4
Time: 7:30pm
Place: Temple Sinai, 2808 Summit St., Oakland, a block from Broadway
www.oaklandsinai.org
Recommended Donations: $15 and for those under 30 and over 80 $10
Questions: Phil Rubin 510-547-8080

Prayerbook Blues?
Are you lost when you open a prayer book? Where did these prayers come from? Who wrote them? How did prayer develop? Join Jamie Hyams for a 3-session exploration of the history, development and purpose of Jewish prayer.

Dates: Feb. 9, Feb.23, March 2
Time: 7:30 – 9:00pm
Place: Beth Chaim, 1800 Holbrook Dr, Danville
Free
www.bethchaim.com

Book Discussion: “Why Be Jewish?”
Ruth Andrew Ellenson, author of The Modern Jewish Girl’s Guide to Guilt, and Ari Y. Kelman, Jim Joseph Chair in Education and Jewish Studies at the Stanford Graduate School of Education, will discuss the late Edgar M. Bronfman’s book Why Be Jewish?
Ms. Ellenson was Bronfman’s literary collaborator on this compelling reflection on what it means to be Jewish in the modern age. The topics of Jewish identity, ritual, faith, secularism and the future of the Jewish world will be addressed. As the book jacket of Why Be Jewish? states, Edgar Bronfman “makes a compelling case for the meaning and transcendence of a secular Judaism that is still steeped in deep moral values, authentic Jewish texts and a focus on deed over creed or dogma.” The talk will be followed by a Q & A session.

Date: Thursday, February 9
Time: 7:00–7:30pm Happy hour schmooze
7:30pm Discussion begins
Place: Palo Alto JCC, 3921 Fabian Way, Palo Alto, Room F-401
Cost: $10 Students | $12 Members and J-Pass holders | $15 General Public
One drink is included in the price of each ticket
Info: Ilanit Gal | (650) 223-8649 | igal@paloaltojcc.org

Family Learning Day: The Secret Life of Bees and Trees
The Secret Life of Bees and Trees: an Urban Shtetl community-wide, family Tu B’Shevat celebration! We welcome kids of all ages to come celebrate the new year of trees with learning, connecting, art, and games in our cozy sanctuary. A beekeeper will teach us secrets from the bees, plus enjoy stories from Joel Ben Izzy, art projects, honey making games and more.

Date: Sunday, Feb. 12
Time: 10:00-2:00pm
Place: Chochmat Halev, 2215 Prince St., Berkeley
Cost: $40/family in advance; $50/family at the door
Sign up here.

Wilderness Torah’s Tu B’Shvat in the Redwoods
Come to the redwoods to celebrate Tu B’Shvat, the unseen awakening of spring. In the tradition of the Tsfat mystics, we gather in the forest to create an experiential Tu B’Shvat seder that connects us to the trees and the elements. Morning seder, kids program, and afternoon workshops!

Date: Sunday, February 12
Time: 10 am to 3:30 pm
Place: Roberts Regional Recreation Area, Oakland
Cost: See Wilderness Torah’s website for pricing details.
Register here by Thursday, Feb 9 – Advance tickets only, none available on site.

Master the Interfaith, Intercultural, Multigenerational Seder
What do you do when you have Muslims, Christians, atheists and Jews coming to your Seder? And they are all different ages, from toddler to senior? You make it fun and you make sure no one is succumbing to hungry before the meal.
We’ll discuss food planning, toys at the table, games ANYONE can play, and how everyone can have fun – even YOU!
Come discuss ways to engage people of different ages, cultures and religions in your Seder.

Date: Sunday, March 19
Time: 10:30am to 12noon
Place: Beth Emek, 3400 Nevada Court, Pleasanton
Free

Posted by admin under Community Activities, Passover
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family

The email from this Jewish Dad is a pretty common view for men from Reform congregations. For that matter, it’s a pretty common view period. But what do you do when your opinion differs from that of others? I replied to him in my Mixed and Matched column in the J-weekly.

My wife is not Jewish but is totally on-board with raising our kids as Jews. We belong to a Reform synagogue that is wonderful to our entire family. Our children go to preschool there and are being raised with all the Jewish holidays. My concern is that Conservative and Orthodox Jews don’t see my kids as Jewish. I don’t see any reason to have our kids go to the mikvah, but I know that in my parents’ Conservative congregation, my kids can’t have an aliyah. Why can’t they understand that in today’s world we are all post-denominational Jews?
— Dad of Two Great Kids

Dear Dad: You have raised a very important point — whose rules are we going by? You and your wife have decided to do things in a way that meets your needs and your view of a shared Jewish American life. You may think the Jewish world should change and reshape itself to better match your view. The trouble is that Jews who adhere to traditional Jewish law feel you should see things their way. In fact, every other Jew out there has an opinion and is as unlikely to modify it to match yours as you are to match theirs. Thus, we are at a standstill.

Too often, an interfaith family has that very American belief that they should be able to have things as they wish. We are all vulnerable to thinking within our own paradigm. One of the most beautiful things about Judaism is that many opinions can be held or at least listened to and validated, even if they are contradictory.

Learn more. I invite you to learn about the views of non-Reform Judaism. Take a class, possibly with a rabbi, from another stream of Judaism. You can check out the Lehrhaus Judaica catalog to find classes and teachers from all backgrounds offered all around the Bay Area. Additionally, you can go online to see what adult education classes are offered at synagogues near you.

Suspend judgment. Go into the class with the mindset of an explorer — what do the Jews at this shul teach and believe? Note that they don’t all agree with each other, but it is likely that they hold certain views across the congregation. Just as your Reform synagogue believes that the child of a Jewish man can and should have a bar or bat mitzvah right there on their bimah, the members of other shuls will have different shared views. A common Reconstructionist saying — followed by the more liberal streams — is that the past (i.e., tradition or halachah) has a vote, not a veto. However, in other movements halachah has a great deal more than a vote.

Meet other Jews. Make an appointment with a Conservative and an Orthodox rabbi. There are many friendly ones in the Bay Area and I’d be happy to help you identify someone with whom you could speak.

What am I hoping for you? Well, there are several possible outcomes.

One, you would come away with a clear understanding of the halachic reasons for your children’s status and you will agree to disagree. In this case, you will need to develop a message that you will give to your children, and wife, about their status. The message should be honest and supportive of your children’s identity as Jews. You will also want to develop a message for the community at large for times when your children’s Jewish identity is questioned.

Two, you may decide that you want your children to be recognized by your parents’ Conservative congregation and therefore you want to take them to the mikvah. Here you’ll need to explain this to your wife without insulting her. Arranging the details will require talking to your rabbi.

Three, and this is the one I hope you avoid, you may simply be upset and do nothing.

Many members of our community want to be angry and sullen toward the Jews who don’t agree with their views of patrilineal descent. Please don’t get lost in this dead-end position. Discuss things with your wife and your rabbi. Make some affirmative decisions.

Finally, Dad, you have time, but not forever. Call me if you want to discuss your options. I can help you find a class and/or a rabbi for an informational interview.

Posted by admin under Children, Mixed & Matched, Parenting
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